I really enjoyed it

I just returned from the Kailash Tribal School and I really enjoyed it. The teacher has decades of experience and has a balanced and moderate approach to yoga. He won't push you beyond your limits or into any positions you aren't ready for. I especially loved that aspect of it because I think that yoga is all about breath, moving at your own pace and finding a good center. Some yoga videos I've done move so quickly and just seem "too fast." He'll hold downward dog for several breaths and you'll quickly work up a sweat. I feel like I gained so much in the course. We spent 4 hours a day doing yoga. We had 2 hours of Ashtanga in the morning and 2 hours of Hatha in the afternoon. We also spent an hour a day learning about cleanses, breathing, meditation and chanting. Then, another 2 hours of lecture in the afternoon. It's a pretty intensive course, but it is a great introduction to teaching yoga. I know people who did the 500 hours and their knowledge is about double and a half mine (literally because that's how much more they do!). I'd say I'm glad I didn't do the 500 hours there. I think for me it will be better to break it up. I'm thinking I might get my next 300 hours later after I've processed what I learned. It definitely depends on what you're looking for. If you want to teach professionally, I'd recommend 500 hours and it's probably easier and more cost-effective to do it all at once. I don't actually feel confident enough to teach alone and independently at this point. I'd want much more practice - probably 300 hours worth! I feel ready to teach family and friends and perhaps understudy with an experienced teacher, but I think 200 should be considered entry-level/intern level. There is soooo much involved in the world of yoga and ayurveda. You could literally study it for years. And, it also depends on how much you already know about yoga. If you are experienced, you'll be able to start studying how to teach it faster. I am not as experienced, so I spent the first two weeks learning how to do the postures properly. The on-site housing is fantastic. We had a kitchen and wonderful porch with a stunning view of the valley/city. The rooms are clean and bright and all the cooking/bathroom supplies are provided. The town itself is tourist friendly with lots of places to eat vegetarian food and hike. Although, I'd recommend turning inward for the experience. There were some days I never left our little yogi cottage area because the yoga room was just upstairs. It feels like a little haven compared with all the shops and tuk-tuks and excitement of the streets, which are all the things that a tourist in India loves, but are also things that can distract you from your yogic bliss. I think the most important aspect of the course is that everyone internalizes yoga differently. And, this is especially important when teaching. What is helpful for one person, may not be helpful for another. And also, just because you enjoy a certain position or can move your body one way, it doesn't mean that it is the best way to teach it. Our class was in constant dialogue about what worked for us, why it was helpful or why it was not. I loved hearing about how yoga works for other people. I also loved the focus on yoga for your dosha (element). Some people need vigorous yoga, others need slow yoga, depending on their constitution. And, they don't always crave the kind of yoga they need. So, that is a very interesting topic. Yoga in the west is quite different than yoga in the east and I think that's the benefit to learning yoga in India itself. You will connect with yoga in a way that is closer to how it originally evolved before it left the east and traveled to the west and was digested and expressed with a western flare. I think it is always better to learn from a different perspective so that your own becomes stronger. Oh, you mentioned teaching for kids. He does cover teaching for kids a bit. I was also interested in that topic, so we discussed for a day or two. I think if you're interested specifically in children, you should let him know and he could probably give you more information. Although I think the best approach is to take the information he provides and then practice and gain experience later through attending and teaching classes. Teaching yoga is like teaching anything. You learn the principles and then when you step into the classroom, you begin to apply them, but not usually before or maybe just in your head! Let me know if you have any other questions. I'm happy to help. If you do decide to go, say hi to yoga shividas from me. I am so glad I attended his course. I think it will impact my life positively for years to come. He has helped me to view my life through a more balanced lens and also showed me how to think critically about the kind of yoga that I practice and why.

Tracey Goldner
traceygoldner@gmail.com Tracey Goldner, 540 NW Silverado Dr, Beaverton OR 97006.

5.0
2018-08-10T14:46:14+00:00

Tracey Goldner
traceygoldner@gmail.com Tracey Goldner, 540 NW Silverado Dr, Beaverton OR 97006.